Sessions

  • Gallbladder diseases considered here include gallstones, tumors, and acute acalculous cholecystitis. Gallbladder stones are an extremely common disorder and are usually asymptomatic. Some patients experience biliary colic, an intermittent and often severe pain in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant, and at times between the scapula because of temporary obstruction of the cystic duct with a gallstone. If the cystic duct obstruction persists, the gallbladder becomes inflamed and the patient develops cholecystitis, an acute inflammation and infection of the gallbladder.

    Biliary tract diseases considered one of the most common causes of extra hepatic biliary obstruction is choledocholithiasis, with one or more stones in the common bile duct or common hepatic duct causing biliary obstruction. Cholangiocarcinoma is an adenocarcinoma of the intrahepatic or extra hepatic bile duct.

  • Unlike liver disease, there are no gastrointestinal diseases specifically caused by pregnancy. However, pregnancy may complicate most gastrointestinal diseases, particularly gastroesophageal reflux and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, gastrointestinal symptoms are extremely common in the pregnant patient. Symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and dyspepsia occur in 50–90% of all patients.

  • Gastrointestinal disorders is the term used to refer to any condition or disease that occurs within the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract (also called the GI tract) is a series of hollow organs that form a long continuous passage from our mouth to our anus. The organs that make up our GI tract are our mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus. Our GI tract, together with our liver, pancreas, and gallbladder, make up our digestive system.

  • Gastrointestinal pathology is the subspecialty of surgical pathology which deals with the diagnosis and characterization of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the digestive tract and accessory organs, such as the pancreas and liver.

  • Therapy of pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders is best done within the context of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach. Pharmacotherapy is often sought by patients and families who hope to find a “pill” that will lead to rapid symptom relief. Yet, there is only scant published evidence for the efficacy of a variety of medical interventions in childhood functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome. This article reviews the pediatric studies that have addressed pharmacotherapy in children with pain predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  • Radiologists within the channel Radiology Section perform and interpret picture taking studies of the tract, as well as the throat, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, bowel, colon, and biliary system. Specific procedures performed embody esophagram, upper gastrointestinal series, small internal organ series, enteroclysis, and each single and air-contrast enema. Plain films of the abdomen are taken during this section.

    Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or upper GI uses a form of real-time x-ray called fluoroscopy and a barium-based contrast material to produce images of the esophagus, stomach and small intestine. It is safe, noninvasive, and may be used to help accurately diagnose pain, acid reflux, blood in the stool and other symptoms.

  • Gastrointestinal surgery is a treatment for diseases of the parts of the body involved in digestion. This includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. It also includes the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.

    Surgery may be used to remove a cancerous or noncancerous growth or damaged part of the body, such as the intestine. It may also be used to repair a problem like a hernia (a hole or weak spot in the wall of the abdomen). Minor surgical procedures are used to screen and diagnose problems of the digestive system.

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a term for two conditions (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) that are characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prolonged inflammation results in damage to the GI tract.

  • Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition specialists provide comprehensive evaluation, diagnostic procedures, and therapy for infants, children, and adolescents with disorders of the stomach, intestines, colon, liver, and pancreas.

  • Interventional radiology plays an important role in the multidisciplinary field of palliative care by offering a wide range of minimally invasive procedures to increase the quality of a patient's life and to achieve goals of care.

  • Pancreatic and biliary conditions typically impact our liver, pancreas, gallbladder and/or the bile ducts. These conditions are often associated with long-term damage to the organ itself or surrounding tissue. Sometimes these problems are genetically predetermined. When in trouble, these organs can cause severe symptoms, but they also can silently cause issues.

  • Gastroenterology is the branch of medicine focused on the digestive system and its disorders. Diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract, which include the organs from mouth into anus, along the alimentary canal, are the focus of this speciality. Physicians practicing in this field are called gastroenterologists.

  • Bariatric surgery includes a variety of procedures performed on people who have obesity. Weight loss is achieved by reducing the size of the stomach with a gastric band or through removal of a portion of the stomach or by resecting and re-routing the small intestine to a small stomach pouch.

  • Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. These cancers can also be named colon cancer or rectal cancer, depending on where they start. Colon cancer and rectal cancer are often grouped together because they have many features in common.

  • The Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy provides a full range of services for adult and adolescent patients with disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, biliary tree and liver.

  • The esophagus is the muscular tube that carries food, and liquids from your mouth to the stomach. You may not be aware of your esophagus until you swallow something too large, too hot, or too cold. You may also notice it when something is wrong. You may feel pain or have trouble swallowing. The most common problem with the esophagusis GERD (gastro esophageal reflux disease). With GERD, a muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly. This allows stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it. Over time, GERD can cause damage to the esophagus. Other problems include heartburn, cancer, and esophagitis. Doctors may use various tests to make a diagnosis. These include imaging tests, an upper endoscopy, and a biopsy.

+1-315-902-2237